A-Z of Phrased & Confused at Liverpool Acoustic Festival

Z is for…

ZZZZZZ – the zeds we’ll be doing on Friday night after the gig.  See you there!

Y is for…

Your New Favourite Poet, Luke Wright’s cheekily titled second ‘set’ of poems that went down a storm in Edinburgh in 2012.  He’s clearly been doing all the right things since then – his latest show What I Learned from Johnny Bevan won a Fringe First for New Writing at this year’s Edinburgh Festival and an Acting Excellence Award from The Stage.

“Wright is a rock’n’roll balladeer in scarlet brogues, a performer who wouldn’t look out of place marching with the Chartists, scratching at London’s underworld with Oscar Wilde or doing guest vocals with The Smiths … Rock’n’roll tour de force of performance poetry” * * * * The List

X is for…

X marks the spot – Liverpool Philharmonic’s Music Room to be precise – where we’ll be from early evening on Friday.  Doors open at 5pm so come and collect your Liverpool Acoustic Festival wristband, grab a drink, try your hand at automatic poetry or feed words to our robot.  There’ll be plenty to do before things kick off on stage at 6.30!

W is for…

Willies are more dangerous than guns by Hollie McNish.  Nuff said.

V is for…

Vidar Norheim, Lizzie Nunnery’s artistic collaborator.  Norwegian musician and songwriter Vidar has been based in Liverpool for more than 10 years and was a founder member of the Wave Machines.  Find out more about Lizzie and Vidar’s award-winning musical partnership here.

U is for…

Unity Theatre, a venue with a radical and experimental history, which makes it a perfect commissioning partner for our new work by Lizzie Nunnery.   Liverpool I love your horny handed tons of soul takes as its inspiration  Mersey Sound poet Adrian Henri to explore what happens when music, poetry and digital technology collide.  Find out more about the commission here and more about Unity Theatre here.

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T is for…

Tonight at Noon by Adrian Henri.  Some of the jazzers among you will know this is the title of an album by Charles Mingus.  Here Henri takes the line as inspiration for a poem about hopeless love.

S is for…

Scroobius Pip vs Mark Grist in a Don’t Flop full rap battle! Let the insults flow…

 

R is for…

Rogue Teacher, Mark Grist’s one-man show in which he takes you on his true journey from over enthusiastic English teacher to world-wide rap battle sensation, as he leaves teaching to pursue his life long dream of being a full time artist.  Here’s A Teacher, eh?, one of our favourite of Mark’s poems about being a teacher.

Q is for…

Quizzes, Poems and Prizes! It wouldn’t be a Phrased & Confused gig if we didn’t go all out on the bits and bobs that make our events just a bit different.  This time around we’ve been inspired by the urban architecture of Liverpool, paper and automatic poetry and we’ve come up with some things that audience members you can get stuck into in between the musicians and poets on stage.

P is for…

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Liverpool Philharmonic, Liverpool’s premier venue for live music and our partner for Phrased & Confused at Liverpool Acoustic Festival.  This is the first year that LAF has run across several sites in Hope Street, and we’re really pleased to have been asked to programme one of the nights.

 

O is for…

Oracles, a song cycle for voice and choir by Ana Silvera, first performed at the Roundhouse in 2011 and featuring the landmark arts venue’s experimental choir.  This short film documents the making of the piece and the inspirations behind its creation.

N is for…

Nobody Told Me, Hollie McNish’s new book – a brilliant collection of poems and stories taken from Hollie’s diaries on raising a child in modern Britain.  It’s been getting rave reviews – check out this Guardian interview with Hollie about it – and here’s a lovely reading of Anyone’s Anyone from the book…

M is for…

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The Music Room, Liverpool Philharmonic’s new performance space, and the venue for our upcoming Phrased & Confused night as part of Liverpool Acoustic Festival on Friday 18th March.  It’s a friendly, informal space and just perfect for our planned mix of intimate torch songs and lyrical spoken word.

L is for…

Letters and Stamps by Isiah Hull, one of this year’s BBC Words First Finalists, and just one of the mega poets on our P&C bill for Liverpool Acoustic Festival.

K is for…

Knut, our polargraph (robot to you and me!), named after the orphaned polar cub born in captivity at Berlin Zoo and raised by the zookeepers.  You can read all about the ensuing Knutmania here, and see what our namesake, Robot Knut is up to on the windows of the Liverpool Phil on Friday the 18th, as part of our P&C night!

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J is for…

John-PeelLegendary Liverpool DJ John Peel who produced the very first album by Adrian Henri’s Liverpool Scene, a poetry band in the late 60s. John called Adrian Henri “one of the great non-singers of our time”, and despite Liverpool Scene disbanding in 1970,  he collaborated with jazz, rock and classical musicians throughout his career.  You can read more about the influential painter, performer and poet here and how he’s influencing Lizzie Nunnery’s new work for Phrased & Confused here.

I is for…

IDS, Luke Wright’s poem about the architect of the Bedroom Tax and Universal Credit, Ian Duncan Smith.  It’s also a univocalism – an homage to the letter i in poetic form!

IDS – in only one vowel

H is for…

Isaiah Hull, this 18-year old from Manchester is already making waves and is one of the BBC Words First finalists we’re presenting as part of our 18th March gig at Liverpool Phil.

G is for…

Girls who Read by Mark Grist.  We love Mark’s youtube videos, made in collaboration with film-maker Guy Larsen.  We’re definitely Girls Who Read so it’s pleasing to see this film had 3.5 million views!

F is for…

Flo Rida –  Blow my Whistle by Hollie McNish, in which Hollie takes Flo Rida’s original as a starting point for searing deconstruction of sexism in hip hop.  It’s brilliant!  Hollie’s written it to play over Flo Rida’s original video and you can do that here.

E is for…

Essex Lion, by P&C compere Luke Wright. Ever seen a lion? In the wild? In England? A couple of years ago in Clacton some campers thought they did. Relive this surreal story with Luke, featuring such immortal lines as

Officer don’t be a benny
the thing we saw was MGM-y.

D is for…

DOES Liverpool, a brilliant community of artists, makers, coders and hardware specialists  in Liverpool who are collaborating with us on a new commission with Lizzie Nunnery.  The commission is inspired by poet Adrian Heni and the built architecture of the city and we hear rumours that a polargraph – a type of robot – will be live drawing as part of our event on the 18th March.  Find out more about DOES here, and details of the commission here.

 

Tosca is alive! 1st drawing from our new Polargraph #weeknotes

A video posted by Adrian McEwen (@amcewen_) on

C is for…

Company of Ghosts by Lizzie Nunnery and Vidar Nordheim.  Lizzie is performing with her band on the 18th March.  She’s also sharing a new work we’ve asked her to create about Liverpool and the Mersey Sound.  Find out more about that here!

 

B is for…

Blizzard, whose Don’t Flop rap battle with P&C poet Mark Grist (in his English Teacher mode) attracted over 5 million – yes 5 million! – views on youtube.  Check it out – still hilarious!

 

And BBC1xtra, who together with Roundhouse, have been running the brilliant Words First season and talent development programme around the country.  We’re partnering with Words First to bring two talented finalists from the North of England, Isaiah Hull and Asthma Elbadawi, to Liverpool.

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A is for…

Ana Silvera and her beautiful album The Aviary. “Gorgeous…a stunning album that mixes operatic and folk elements with magical storytelling’ said The Guardian.
Here’s a track from it for your aural pleasure…

And A is also for Asma Elbadawi, a British=Sudanese poet from Bradford and a recent finalist in the BBC/Roundhouse Words First programme.  Here’s Asma in action…